WordPress’s extended family

WordPress’s extended family

Matt gave a shoutout to WordPress’s “cousins” like BuddyPress and bbPress, highlighting a lot of features that have gone into the software in the last year.

BuddyPress and bbPress

WordPress.org itself uses BuddyPress and bbPress. For ages, it’s used outdated versions of bbPress, and in the past year launched a new support form that uses modern bbPress and WordPress profiles use bbPress. Matt says projects like these will get new support and engagement over the next year.

HackerOne

HackerOne is a security website that allows software organizations to offer bounties to hackers for responsibly disclosing security bugs.

GlotPress

GlotPress has had a big transformation in the last year, as it is no longer standalone software on top of BackPress, but rather a plugin for WordPress. If you’ve never been to translate.WordPress.org, you’ve seen GlotPress in action, and it’s pretty amazing.

WordPress.org

WordPress.org is a central hub for the WordPress community. Matt highlighted some of the work that’s been going on this past year around languages, support forums, and more. He also says that new work will be going into P2/O2, which are used for the Make WordPress blogs.

And he gave attention to the new WordPress plugin repository, which finally uses WordPress itself, and has a whole new design. You can see the new design in action on the new demo site, which should role out to the main Plugins directory soon.

WordPress in all languages

WordPress 4.6 was available in 50 languages the day it was released. And the top 10 plugins are 82% translated in the top 12 languages used in WordPress.

Language packs have been a huge help in helping translate plugins as a community project on Translate.WordPress.org, rather than having to ship translations inside the plugin itself.

1,598 plugins are now using language packs, and 1,224 themes use them. This is huge for the future of WordPress working great in every language.

Also, in WordPress 4.7, we’ll see per-user language choices.

Learning JavaScript Deeply

Last year’s homework for the community was to learn JavaScript deeply. He says that WordPress is 28% JavaScript now, which hasn’t changed, but he says we’ve still made a lot of progress.

Matt gave himself a personal challenge to learn JavaScript, and he said that 364 days into this challenge, he submitted his first patch to Calypso (Automattic’s WordPress administration interface). He said, learning JavaScript and becoming as native with JavaScript as with PHP is going to be really important — especially as the REST API gets included in WordPress 4.7.

WordPress Growth Council

Matt recently posted about a WordPress Growth Council to help WordPress grow and maintain marketshare.

He says that what got WordPress to where it is today, won’t get WordPress to where it can be tomorrow. He blogged about this new growth council, which folks can apply for, which will help guide product direction in WordPress going forward.

Matt actually said in Post Status Slack recently that if WordPress doesn’t make changes to the interface and otherwise, he’d expect WordPress marketshare would begin to decline by 2018.

HTTPS & PHP7

11.45% of WordPress websites are now served via HTTPS. Matt talked last year about how LetsEncrypt and PHP7 were going to be a big deal, but they’ve turned out to be, “huge.” And WordPress will now start applying progressive enhancement techniques for WordPress websites.

WordPress.com is now fully on PHP7, which he says was an enormous accomplishment. He’s also announced that WordPress.org will now recommendPHP7 by default.

Calypso

Matt gave some updates on Calypso’s adoption since it was released last year. He says that 68% of posts on WordPress.com are now written in Calypso. 17% of posts are written via a mobile device, and only 15% of users are using the WordPress admin. For reference, Calypso is the default method of publishing on WordPress.com now, so that includes the desktop website, desktop app, and mobile app.

Matt says that building Calypso is like, “building a plane while it’s flying.” And while it’s hard, he says it’s worth it, but it’s like rebuilding WordPress — which took 13 years to do — in only two years.

The future of Calypso includes making it “plugin aware”, so that prominent plugins (most Automattic plugins included) would be recognized and manageable via Calypso.

In fact, Calypso is plugin aware today, as the merge has just happened. So now plugins can include custom code to be manageable via Calypso. This is an interesting move to me, especially since Calypso — while open source — isn’t an official WordPress project, but rather an Automattic-owned interface.

Matt says that someday he’s like to see Calypso, “or something like it,” eventually to become the WordPress interface.

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